f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Artist Shintaro Ohata Seamlessly Blends Sculpture and Canvas to Create 3D Paintings

When first viewing the artwork of Shintaro Ohata up close it appears the scenes are made from simple oil paints, but take a step back and you’re in for a surprise. Each piece is actually a hybrid of painted canvas and sculpture that blend almost flawlessly in color and texture to create a single image. The cinematic figures are sculpted from polystyrene while the backgrounds are made from traditional painting techniques.

I love this! And you should too.
If I ever finish my story, I want illustrations that look like this. Please and thank you.


This is relevant to my life.

This is relevant to my life.

toelle:

이미지박스 - 한울의 그림으로 읽는 책 by Hanuol

toelle:

이미지박스 - 한울의 그림으로 읽는 책 by Hanuol

cathodenarcissus:

tomwaitsatthediner:

Papier mache Tom Waits 

 The papier-mache has been drinking, not me.
(Is ot just me though, or does this look a hell of a lot like Ronald Reagan? :/)

cathodenarcissus:

tomwaitsatthediner:

Papier mache Tom Waits 

 The papier-mache has been drinking, not me.

(Is ot just me though, or does this look a hell of a lot like Ronald Reagan? :/)

hrtbps:

In 2006, Dutch artists Haas&Hahn started Favela Painting, a “community-driven art intervention” in the slums of Rio de Janeiro. With the help of local youths, who are paid for their efforts and taught construction skills, the duo bring brightly-colored murals and other artistic scenes to the poorest areas of Rio.
Their ultimate goal is to paint an entire hillside favela. (via)

hrtbps:

In 2006, Dutch artists Haas&Hahn started Favela Painting, a “community-driven art intervention” in the slums of Rio de Janeiro. With the help of local youths, who are paid for their efforts and taught construction skills, the duo bring brightly-colored murals and other artistic scenes to the poorest areas of Rio.

Their ultimate goal is to paint an entire hillside favela. (via)

hrtbps:

Secret cinema found beneath Paris
In September 2004, French police discovered a hidden chamber in the catacombs under Paris. It contained a full-sized movie screen, projection equipment, a bar, a pressure cooker for making couscous, a professionally installed electricity system, and at least three phone lines. Movies ranged from 1950s noir classics to recent thrillers.
When the police returned three days later, the phone and power lines had been cut and there was a note on the floor: “Do not try to find us.” (via)

hrtbps:

Secret cinema found beneath Paris

In September 2004, French police discovered a hidden chamber in the catacombs under Paris. It contained a full-sized movie screen, projection equipment, a bar, a pressure cooker for making couscous, a professionally installed electricity system, and at least three phone lines. Movies ranged from 1950s noir classics to recent thrillers.

When the police returned three days later, the phone and power lines had been cut and there was a note on the floor: “Do not try to find us.” (via)